Is a member of the lily family.

This popular vegetable comes in a variety of colors, including green, white and purple. It’s used in dishes around the world, including frittatas, pastas and stir-fries.

Is also low in calories and packed with essential vitamins, minerals and antioxidants.

This article uncovers 7 health benefits of it, all supported by science.

It is low in calories but boasts an impressive nutrient profile.

In fact, just half a cup (90 grams) of cooked contains :

  • Calories: 20
  • Protein: 2.2 grams
  • Fat: 0.2 grams
  • Fiber: 1.8 grams
  • Vitamin C: 12% of the RDI
  • Vitamin A: 18% of the RDI
  • Vitamin K: 57% of the RDI
  • Folate: 34% of the RDI
  • Potassium: 6% of the RDI
  • Phosphorous: 5% of the RDI
  • Vitamin E: 7% of the RDI

Also possesses small amounts of other micronutrients, including iron, zinc and riboflavin.

It’s an excellent source of vitamin K, an essential nutrient involved in blood clotting and bone health.

Steamed chicken with asparagus 10

Should you soak asparagus before cooking?

Do you wash asparagus before roasting? Some people give their asparagus a quick bath before cooking though I find it unnecessary. You will definitely need to clean them well and remove the grit, but beyond that, a soaking isn’t needed.

What part of asparagus is poisonous?

Asparagus. Like the rhubarb, the part of the asparagus plant that we love – the young stems – are perfectly safe to eat. But the asparagus hides a deceptive, nasty secret: Its fruit, which are bright red berries, are toxic to humans.